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MOF&G Cover Spring 2000

News & Events

Maine BPC Public Hearing
Clash of Views on Proposed Pesticide Ban

MOFGA Notes
Spring Growth 2000
Second Annual Spring Thing

Volunteers Wanted

Fair News
Fair Gets Highest Praise
Calling Table and Bench Builders
Dedicated Tree Planting

  

  You are here:  PublicationsMaine Organic Farmer & GardenerSpring 2000   
 The Maine Organic Farmer & Gardener – Spring 2000 Minimize

Camden Community Garden
Camden Community Garden. Lamb photo.

Camden Community Garden – A Model for the Millennium
By Jane Lamb
How can a community garden be a secret garden? Just ask any of the folks who raise their favorite vegetables in the Camden Community Garden.

Panax quinquefolius – American Ginseng, “King of Herbs”
By Joyce White
John Ambagis is passionate about ginseng. “I don’t grow ginseng to make money. I grow it for the magic. I love ginseng,” he said during an interview at his owner-built home in Sumner, in the hills of western Maine, last fall.

Oak Trees From Seed to Seed
By Céline Caron
An oak tree is a climax tree, meaning that it is capable of renewing itself within a complex biological community.

Of Tender Frogs and Cheap Scythe Blades
By Peter Vido
Jean’s little note regarding the “scythe tour” I was to take (The MOF&G, Dec. 1999-Feb. 2000) makes me wonder if she was expecting a report on some pleasant mornings of mowing followed by the noonday’s rest under fragrant hay cocks, while the pretty mountain girls hauled cider from the cool cellars up to the meadows …. No such paradise-like experiences during Central-Europe’s mid-November!

Jerry Sass
Jerry Sass practices low-impact forestry in his 75-acre woodlot in N. Anson. Matt Scease photo.

Low-Impact Logger Plans for the Future
By Matt Scease
Watching landowner and logger Jerry Sass step lightly through the hush of a pine stand, you wouldn’t think his 75-acre woodlot in the central Maine town of North Anson represents a philosophical battleground in the state’s forestry wars.

Nine Practices for a Sustainable Forest
By Jerry Sass
Jerry Sass has been negotiating with a non-profit foundation to manage his property after his death. Below are nine conditions for the management of the woodlot, as Sass has written them.

Preserving Old Logging Technology
By Richard A. Hale
Sometimes older logging methods may meet the special needs of woodlot owners.

Community Farms and Forests Counter Sprawl
By Jean English
Brian Donahue enjoyed the Common Ground Fair last summer. “The type of activities seen at the Fair should be part of our daily lives,” he said. For many of us who live in rural Maine, they are; but Donahue goes a step further: “We should do them in the suburbs.” This is his key to countering sprawl.

Cooperation is Key to Promoting Maine Agriculture
By Jean English
Agriculture Commissioner Bob Spear knows agriculture and he knows politics. Now he just has to combine the two.

Colson on Cole Crops
By Jean English
Dave Colson of New Leaf Farm in Durham, Maine, shared his expertise in growing cole crops at a MOFGA-sponsored talk at the Maine Agricultural Trades Show in January.

Rhubarb
By Roy Beck
I have been in love with rhubarb for a long time, and I believe that this hardy perennial deserves a permanent place of honor in every kitchen garden. Though technically a vegetable, it is used as a fruit – in pies, cakes, preserves and other sweet dishes. Rhubarb is not difficult to grow and enjoy if its needs are met.

Toki Oshima drawing
Toki Oshima drawing

Grow Your Own Pears
By Roberta Bailey
One of the most beautiful sights in the world is a branch laden with Seckel pears – something about that rosy blush against such smooth bronze flesh. Perhaps the anticipation of their sweet, juicy flavor colors the sight even more.

Two-Millennia Dishes
By Roberta Bailey
Time to use up the winter produce. Spring greens are just a thaw away. Save a few of last year’s potatoes to mix with this spring’s greens for a meeting of the two millennia.

Nettles
By Deb Soule
The common nettle (Urtica dioica) is popular among western herbalists because of its extraordinary nutritional and medicinal properties.

Compost-Based Seeding Mixes
By Jean English
Working with compost-based seeding mixes is not a static thing. That was the main message Dr. Will Brinton of Woods End Lab imparted in a MOFGA-sponsored talk at the Maine Agricultural Trades Show in January.

Phosphorus in Soils, Strawberries in June, Beneficials in Media
By Dr. Eric Sideman, MOFGA’s Director of Technical Services
The New England Vegetable and Berry Conference and Trade Show is sort of the opposite of the MOFGA Farmer to Farmer Conference. The NEVBC houses an enormous number of half hour talks that provide an opportunity for growers to learn some basic crop production information in introductory sessions and to get breaking information from new research reports.

A Dual Flock Management System for Rare Poultry Breeds
By Alicia Karen Elkins
For those who want to start raising rare poultry breeds, here’s an ideal dual flock management system that will allow you to maximize your income and production. First, remember that a hen can maintain active egg production for only so long, before she permanently damages her body.

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Tips
CSA List Compiled
New Green Methods Catalog Out
Hydroponic Strawberries
Farm-to-Farm Exchange Program for Kids?
Combining Art and Marketing
Onion of the Month Club?
Maine Cranberry News
Nurturing the Eggs of Our Grandchildren

The MOF&G Index: 1999

Poem
Rhubarb
By Mary Anne Libby

Letters
Thank the Salmon
Organic Integrity
Concerns about Honey and Blueberry Articles

Genetic Engineering of Plants – A Review
By Jean English
How is it done? Genes from organisms that would never cross with plants without human intervention can now be put into plants in two general ways, both known as genetic engineering.

Legislative Alert re: Genetic Engineering
By MOFGA President Sharon Tisher

Editorials

Ten Thousand Acres of Life
By Sharon Tisher, 2000 MOFGA President
As I was thinking of what to say at MOFGA's Annual Meeting on January 11, my thoughts kept coming back to a book I am rereading for a seminar I am teaching this semester: Sandra Steingraber's stunningly sensible Living Downstream: An Ecologist Looks at Cancer and the Environment (Addison Wesley 1997).

The Rest of Us
By Russell Libby, MOFGA Executive Director
Like many of you, I sometimes stop and look at what's happening in the big world around us and wonder whether I make a difference – whether there's really any chance of changing the big trends moving us towards centralization and consolidation.


What I Like About Wal-Mart
By Jean English, Editor, The Maine Organic Farmer & Gardener
Well, not much. However, I did read an article about Wal-Mart, maybe in the November issue of Money magazine, that covered, among other things, Wal-Mart’s outstanding inventory control system.

Reviews & Resources
Herbs in Bloom: A Guide to Growing Herbs as Ornamental Plants
Take the Apple: Essays-Poems-Recipes from Apple Annie
Making Bentwood Trellises, Arbors, Gates & Fences
Planting and Maintaining Sustainable Landscapes
Marketing Newsletter for Farmers
Resources for Value-Added Products


    

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