Login
"Every aspect of our lives is, in a sense, a vote for the kind of world we want to live in."
- Frances Moore Lappé
  You are here:  Recipes   
 Recipes for Schools and Institutions Using Maine Ingredients Minimize

Maine Four Seasons Pie
Maple Roasted Orange Veggies
Maine Pizza
Maine Marinated Veggies for Salad Bars
Maine Fruit Crumble
Aroostook Wheat Berry Fruit Salad
Autumn Harvest Corn Pudding
Barbeque Burgers
Carrot Ginger Soup
Carrot Raisin Slaw
Chicken Pot Pie With Maine Mashed Potatoes
Fresh Tomato Salsa
Italian Inspired Pasta w/ ME White Beans & Veggies
Maine Apple Gingerbread
Maple Roasted Root Vegetables
Pumpkin Snack Cakes
Wild Blueberry Cobbler

MAINE FOUR SEASONS PIE

24 Servings

 

Ingredients

Vegetable cooking spray

12 eggs (at room temperature)                

6 cups (60 oz) veggies, cooked*                                                     

6 cups (24 oz) Cheddar cheese, shredded, low-fat*                                

2 cups flour, all purpose                                                                                 

2 cups flour, whole wheat*                                                                           

4 cups milk, low-fat*                                                                                     

1tablespoon baking powder                                                                                     

Seasonings

 

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and spray a large hotel pan with cooking spray.

Prepare the veggies. Beat eggs.  Mix together flours with baking powder and add to eggs.  Add milk and seasonings.

Stir in veggies and cheese. Bake until set and lightly browned, about 45-60 minutes. Cut into 24 pieces and serve.

 

Nutritional analysis per serving (approximate, varies with filling):  191 calories, 16 grams protein, 21 grams carbohydrates, 5 grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 279 mg. sodium, 3 grams fiber. 

 

USDA School Lunch Guidelines: ¼ cup dark green or orange veggie, 1 serving protein, ½ ounce whole grain

 

*Seasonal Ingredient Suggestions

 

MAY/JUNE:  fiddleheads, spinach, kale, asparagus

Fiddleheads:  blanch fiddleheads in boiling water to kill bacteria.  Drain and roughly chop, drain again.  Season with garlic powder, chopped chives, chopped parsley.

Spinach: Steam spinach and chop.  Drain thoroughly.  Season with garlic powder, chopped chives, chopped parsley.

Kale: Coat kale with olive oil and roast in 400 degree oven.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper and garlic powder.  Chop.  Season with chopped herbs, dried basil.

Asparagus:  Steam asparagus and cut into pieces.  Season with chopped chives, chopped parsley.

 

JULY/AUGUST: summer squash & zucchini, peppers, tomatoes

Summer squash & zucchini: Grate squash.  Cook to remove moisture and drain.  Season with garlic scapes, chopped basil, chopped peppers, fresh herbs.

Peppers: Add chopped peppers to greens like spinach, use with summer squash, use with chopped tomatoes, season with taco seasonings for a Mexican menu.

Tomatoes:  chop and drain.  Season with fresh basil.  Use equal parts of goat cheese and cheddar cheese.  Season with chopped fresh basil, chopped fresh garlic.

 

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER: sweet corn, eggplant, broccoli

Sweet corn: cook corn and scrape from cob.  Season with chopped fresh parsley, chives, basil.  Add chopped peppers for color.

Eggplant: Roast eggplants in 400 degree oven.  Scrape skin from flesh.  Season with chopped parsley, oregano, chopped garlic.

Broccoli:  May use cooked or steamed broccoli.  Chop if needed.  Season with fresh or dried basil, thyme, parsley, chopped garlic.  Chopped peppers add nice color.

 

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER: leeks, squash, frozen veggies

Leeks:  Cut leeks in half.  Wash thoroughly.  Slice into rings.  Coat with olive oil and roast in 400 degree oven.  Season with dried herbs or garlic.

Winter squash: Fold mashed winter squash or pumpkin into batter.  Season with thyme and sage.

 

JANUARY/APRIL: roasted roots, frozen veggies

Roasted roots: Serve Maple Roasted Roots earlier in the week, cooking extra for this pie.  Chop roasted roots and add to batter.  Season lightly.           

 

Aroostook wheat, Maine milk and Maine cheese are available all year.

For updates to these recipes and/or to include comments and input from your test results, please contact:

Cheryl Wixson, cheryl@mofga.org


MAPLE ROASTED ORANGE VEGGIES

25 servings

Ingredients

Approx. 10 lbs prepared orange veggies or roots

½ cup maple syrup*

1 cup olive oil

sea salt to taste

pepper to taste

herbs, seasonings to taste


Directions

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper. 

Peel the veggies, and cut into bite-sized pieces. Whisk together the maple syrup and olive oil.  Coat the veggies with the mixture, and season with salt, pepper, and seasonings. Spread veggies out on pan and roast the vegetables until they are tender, about 35 minutes.  Stir and shake the pan every few minutes to cook veggies evenly. 

Nutritional analysis per serving (approximate, varies with veggies): 166 calories, 2 grams protein, 30 grams carbohydrates, 5 grams fat, 53 mg. sodium, 4.5 grams fiber.

USDA School Lunch Guidelines:  ½ cup veggies

Cheryl's notes: The maple syrup highlights the natural sugars of root vegetables.  Vary the root vegetables to include beets and potatoes. Maple roasted orange veggies are an excellent way to utilize regional, seasonal  ingredients, and provide over 200% of the RDA for Vitamin A, 41% for Vitamin C, and 19% for Vitamin K.

*Seasonal Ingredient Suggestions

MAY/JUNE: salad turnips

JULY/AUGUST: carrots, onions, summer squashes

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER: celeriac, onions, carrots, parsnips, rutabagas, squash, pumpkin

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER: carrots, celeriac, onions, sweet potatoes, turnips, winter squash

JANUARY/APRIL: onions, roots, winter squash

Maine maple syrup is available all year.

 

 

For updates to these recipes and/or to include comments and input from your test results, please contact:

 

Cheryl Wixson, cheryl@mofga.org


MAINE PIZZA

25 servings

Dough

4 ½ cups water

3 tablespoons yeast                                                                                      

6 tablespoons olive oil                                                                                  

1 tablespoon sea salt                                                                                   

3 tablespoons sugar                                                                                      

Approx. 15 cups whole wheat flour, Aroostook*

Directions

Equip the Hobart mixer with the dough hook. In the mixer bowl, add the water, yeast, olive oil, sea salt and sugar.  Add the flour and beat until the dough forms a ball and comes away from the sides of the bowl.  Remove dough to a greased bowl and cover with a damp towel to rise for about 1 hour.

This dough may be shaped into pizzas, calzones, or individual loaves of French bread.  Yields approximately 5 pounds dough.

Topping

6 cups chopped tomato (if canned, drain juice)

6 cups seasonal veggies*

4 cups part-skim mozzarella cheese, grated

2 ½ cups low-fat ricotta cheese

1 cup finely chopped onion

3 tablespoons dried basil

garlic salt and fresh pepper to taste

corn meal for dusting sheet pan

Directions

Preheat the oven to 475 degrees.

In a bowl, combine the mozzarella cheese, ricotta cheese, finely chopped onion, spices and set aside.

Prepare the seasonal veggies. Roll out the pizza dough and fit the dough on a sheet pan dusted with cornmeal. Lightly brush dough with olive oil.  Spread the chopped tomato, then the cheese mixture and top with the prepared seasonal veggies. Bake until bottom is brown and topping heated.

Cut into 25 slices and serve. 

Nutritional analysis per serving (approximate, varies with veggies): 375 calories, 18 grams protein, 53 grams carbohydrates, 12 grams fat, 906 mg. sodium, 8 grams fiber.

USDA School Lunch Guidelines: 3 ounces whole grain, ½ cup veggies, ½ dairy serving

Seasonal Ingredient Suggestions

MAY/JUNE:  chopped greens (spinach, kale), asparagus

JULY/AUGUST:  broccoli, eggplant, greens, peppers, leeks, onions, tomatoes, summer squash

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER:  broccoli, leeks, onions, peppers, summer squash, tomatoes

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER: leeks, onions, greens, carrots

JANUARY/APRIL: leeks, onions, grated roots

Aroostook wheat is available all year.

For updates to these recipes and/or to include comments and input from your test results, please contact:

Cheryl Wixson, 207-568-4142, cheryl@mofga.org


MAINE MARINATED VEGGIES FOR SALAD BARS

25 servings

Ingredients

4 cups dried beans, cooked*

3 cups carrots, thinly sliced

2 onions, thinly sliced*

12-14 cups veggies*

Directions

Blanch the uncooked vegetables briefly until crisp tender. Prepare the cooked beans and seasonal veggies.  Set aside.

Dressing

¾ cup apple cider vinegar*

½ cup olive oil

¼ cup canola oil*

¼ cup sugar                                                                                   

1 tablespoon or to taste dried Italian herbs

pepper to taste

sea salt to taste

Directions

Combine dressing ingredients and mix well, pour over veggies.  Marinate 4 hours or longer.

Serve as a salad, or in components on salad bar.

Nutritional analysis per serving (approximate, varies with veggies): 142 calories, 3 grams protein, 14 grams carbohydrates, 9 grams fat, 336 mg. sodium, 4 grams fiber.

USDA School Lunch Guidelines: ½ - ¾ cup veggie, increase beans for a full legume serving   

Cheryl’s notes:  This is a very basic recipe that can vary widely with ingredients and creativity.  Salad bars are excellent ways to introduce new veggies.  Shapes and sizes are often important to eaters, so be creative, vary the herbs and seasonings, try new cuisines, and enjoy!

*Seasonal Ingredient Suggestions

 

MAY/JUNE: asparagus, fiddleheads, onions, carrots, salad turnips, radishes

JULY/AUGUST: broccoli, peppers, onions, beans, summer squash, cauliflower, carrots, celery

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER:  broccoli, leeks, onions, peppers, cauliflower, dried beans

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER: leeks, onions, carrots, dried beans, frozen beans

JANUARY/APRIL:  onions, roots, frozen veggies, dried beans

 

Maine apple cider vinegar, canola oil, carrots, onions, dried beans are available all year.

For updates to these recipes and/or to include comments and input from your test results, please contact:

Cheryl Wixson, 207-568-4142, cheryl@mofga.org


MAINE FRUIT CRUMBLE

24 servings

Ingredients

Vegetable cooking spray

18 cups fruit*                                                                                                    

1 ¾ cups maple syrup                                                                                      

1 cup flour, all purpose  

                                                                                     

2 cups rolled oats or oatmeal, Aroostook*                                                         

1 cup flour, whole wheat Aroostook*                                                             

1 cup honey, Maine*                                                                                    

1 cup MOO milk butter at room temperature*                                               

2 teaspoons cinnamon                                                                                                                                                                                                  1 teaspoon nutmeg


Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and spray a large hotel pan with cooking spray.

Prepare the fruit.  Mix maple syrup with the fruit and stir in the flour.  Spoon into hotel pan.

Topping

Combine rolled oats, honey, flour, nutmeg and cinnamon.  Cut in butter until crumbly. Sprinkle over fruit mixture. Bake in 350 degree oven for 45-60 minutes, or until fruit is bubbly and topping is golden brown.  Let cool 10 minutes. Cut into 24 pieces and serve.

Nutritional analysis per serving (approximate, varies with fruit):  285 calories, 3 grams protein,  52 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 50 mg. sodium, 4 grams fiber. 

USDA School Lunch Guidelines: ¾ cup fruit, 1 ounce whole grain

 

*Seasonal Ingredient Suggestions

MAY/JUNE: rhubarb, wild blueberries (frozen)

Rhubarb: scrub, cut into chunks. May also be frozen for later use.

Wild blueberries: may be used either fresh or frozen, use right from the box.

 

JULY/AUGUST: Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, peaches, plums, wild blueberries

Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries:  pick fruit over, wash well.  Blackberries and raspberries may be too seedy to use without combining with another fruit like apples or peaches.

Peaches, plums: wash, cut in half, remove pits and slice. Not necessary to peel, but if desired, blanch in hot water and slip off skins.

Wild blueberries: may be used either fresh or frozen, use right from the box.

 

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER: apples, pears, cranberries, wild blueberries (frozen)

Apples:  wash, core and slice.  Apples do not need to be peeled.  May use lemon juice to prevent

browning.

Pears:  wash, core and slice.  No need to peel.

Cranberries:  may be used frozen or fresh.  May need to adjust sweetener due to tartness.  Best when combined with other fruits like apples or wild blueberries.

Wild blueberries: may be used either fresh or frozen, use right from the box.

 

NOVEMBER/APRIL: apples, wild blueberries (frozen)

Apples:  wash, core and slice.  Apples do not need to be peeled.  May use lemon juice to prevent

browning.

Wild blueberries: may be used either fresh or frozen, use right from the box.

 

Aroostook wheat and rolled oats, Maine honey, and MOO milk butter are available all year.

For updates to these recipes and/or to include comments and input from your test results, please contact:

 Cheryl Wixson, 207-568-4142, cheryl@mofga.org


AROOSTOOK WHEAT BERRY FRUIT SALAD
Wheat berries are the whole, unprocessed kernels of wheat.  Packed with B vitamins, zinc, iron, and fiber, they have a chewy texture and nutty flavor.  To cook, combine 4 cups berries with 14 cups water in a large pot.  Bring to a boil and simmer, covered, until tender, about 45 minutes or more. Drain and rinse.  Cooked berries may be stored in the refrigerator or freezer.

7 cups cooked wheat berries
1 cup orange juice
1 cup dried cranberries
4 apples, cored, unpeeled, and cut into cubes
1 1/2 cups toasted, chopped pecans
1/3 cup raspberry vinegar
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
Sea salt and fresh pepper to taste

In a small bowl, combine the cranberries and orange juice.  Warm a bit in the microwave and let soak.  In a large bowl, combine the wheat berries, pecans and apple chunks.  Add the cranberries and orange juice, stirring gently.  In a small bowl, whisk together the raspberry vinegar, chopped parsley and olive oil.  Add to the wheat berries.  Season to taste with sea salt and fresh pepper.  Makes 25 servings, each about  1/2 cup.

Testing note:  More chopped fruits may be added to this salad to encourage young people to try it, like blueberries and strawberries.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 218 calories, 5.5 grams protein, 30 grams carbohydrates, 9.6 grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 120 mg. sodium, 5 grams fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
AUTUMN HARVEST CORN & CHEVRE PUDDING
This is a delicious custard that is thickened by puréeing half of the corn in the food processor.  In this recipe, fresh basil and Maine goat cheese contribute to the flavors.  You could also make this versatile pudding with other cooked vegetables, dried herbs, even Maine shrimp or lobster. Autumn Harvest Corn Pudding is perfect for utilizing extra corn-on-the-cob from a prior meal, or you may use frozen corn, just be sure it is extra-sweet. 

8 cups sweet corn
2 cups fresh basil leaves, chopped
1/3 cup all purpose flour
4 cups whole milk
8 eggs
Sea salt and fresh pepper to taste
8 ounces chevre (Maine goat cheese)  (optional)

Grease a large hotel baking pan.  Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

In the bowl of your food processor, pulse 4 cups of the sweet corn until chopped.  Scrape into a large bowl.  Stir in the remaining corn, basil and flour.   Whisk in the milk and eggs.  Season with sea salt and fresh pepper.  Pour the mixture into the baking dish.  Sprinkle the goat cheese over the mixture.  Bake in the oven until set, about 45 minutes to one hour.  Let stand 15 minutes before serving.  Autumn Harvest Corn & Chevre Pudding may be served hot, cold or at room temperature.  Makes 25 servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving:  130 calories, 7 grams protein, 15 grams carbohydrates, 5 grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 76 mg. sodium, 1.5 grams fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
BARBEQUE BURGERS
These burgers freeze extremely well, and you can cook them on the grill directly from the freezer.   Adding chopped vegetables and cooked wheat berries increases the nutritional value and fiber content.  Vary the type of barbeque sauce according to your taste.

2.5 pounds ground beef or ground turkey
2.5 cups cooked wheat berries *
2.5 cups chopped veggies (onions, carrots, peppers)
10 ounces grated cheddar cheese
2 1/2 cups barbeque sauce
2 1/2 cups dried bread crumbs

* Wheat berries are the whole, uncooked kernels of wheat that is ground to make bread.  To cook, add 2 cups dry berries to 7 cups water.  Boil until berries are just tender, about 45 minutes.  Drain and use.  2 cups dry berries makes about 3 1/2 cups cooked berries.

Mix ingredients together in a large bowl.  Shape into patties.  Freeze or refrigerate until ready to use.  To cook, bake in a hotel pan in a 350 degree oven.  Or these burgers may be cooked on the grill.

This mixture can also be used to make meatloaf or meatballs.  Add one egg to the meat mixture and then shape.

Yield:  25 – four ounce burgers

Nutritional analysis per serving (made with lean ground beef):  276 calories, 18 grams protein, 24 grams carbohydrates, 12 grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 450 mg. sodium, 3 grams fiber.

Nutritional analysis per serving (made with ground turkey): 227 calories, 14 grams protein, 24 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 450 mg. sodium, 3 grams fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
CARROT GINGER SOUP
This velvety soup is a snap to make, and can be served either cold or hot.  I have also substituted orange juice for the stock for the extra Vitamin C.  Carrot Ginger Soup may also be an encore, using carrots cooked with fresh ginger from a previous meal.  This soup freezes well.

6 cups chopped onion (about 6 large)
3 pounds scrubbed and roughly chopped carrots
1/3 cup olive oil
1 – 1 inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
14 cups stock (chicken or vegetable)
Sea salt and fresh pepper to taste


Heat the oil in a heavy soup pot over medium heat.  Add the onions and sauté briefly.  Add the chopped carrots and ginger, sautéing until the ginger starts to become fragrant, about 5 minutes.  Add the stock.  Bring the mixture to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, cover the pot and cook until the carrots are tender.  Let the mixture cool slightly.  Puree the soup in batches in a blender.  Be careful not to fill the blender more than half-way!   Return the soup to the pot and season to taste with sea salt and fresh pepper. Ladle the soup into hot soup plates or cups.  If desired, the top may be garnished with sour cream, yogurt or crème fraiche.  The soup may also be chilled and served cold.   Makes about 25 – 1 cup servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 74 calories, 3 grams protein, 10 grams carbohydrates, 3 gram fat ( 0 grams trans fat), 349 mg. sodium, 2 grams fiber.  Bonus:  73% RDA Vitamin A.

Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
CARROT RAISIN SLAW
This salad contrasts the sharp taste of cumin with the sweetness of raisins.  Nutritional benefits include 71% RDA of Vitamin A,   51% RDA of Vitamin K, and 21% RDA of Vitamin C. 


6 large carrots (about 1 1/2 pounds or 6 cups), grated
6 cups grated cabbage (about 1 1/2 pounds)
1 1/2 cups raisins plumped in 1 cup hot water
5 ounces rice vinegar or fresh lemon juice
3 ounces canola oil
1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
Scant 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon sugar
Sea salt and fresh pepper to taste
1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley

Grate the carrots and the cabbage into a medium bowl either by hand or food processor.  Add the hot water to the raisins in a small bowl and let set so the raisins will plump.  In a small bowl, whisk together the rice vinegar, canola oil, cumin, sugar, cayenne pepper, chopped fresh parsley.  Season to taste with sea salt and fresh pepper.  Drain the raisins and add to the carrots and cabbage.  Stir the dressing into the salad and serve.  Makes about 24 – 1/2 cup servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 81 calories, 1 grams protein, 12 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 27 mg. sodium, 2 grams fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For more recipes, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
CHICKEN POT PIE WITH MAINE MASHED POTATOES
I love anything smothered with Maine mashed potatoes.  Vary the vegetables in this savory pie, and in the winter, use frozen peas, corn and carrots.  Be sure to save the carcasses from roast chicken and prepare your own stock.


1/3 cup butter
2/3 cup all purpose flour
2 quarts stock, hot
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
1 tablespoon chopped fresh marjoram  (seasonings may vary)
Sea salt and fresh pepper
3 pounds cooked chicken, diced
1 pound zucchini and/ or summer squash, diced
1/2 pound celery, chopped
1/2 pound onion, chopped
1/2 pound carrots, sliced and cooked until al dente
5 pounds potatoes, cooked and made into mashed potatoes


In a large pot, melt the butter and whisk in the flour.  Add the stock slowly, simmering and whisking to form a smooth sauce.  Stir in the thyme and season to taste with sea salt and fresh pepper.

Scrub the potatoes.  Cook in boiling water on top of the stove until tender.  Drain, reserving the water.  Add milk, butter, salt and pepper and some of the cooking liquid.  Mash.

Cut up the vegetables.  Steam or cook them briefly.  In a large bowl, mix together the vegetables, chicken and gravy.  Spoon into a hotel pan.  Smooth the mashed potato over the top.  Cook in a 350 degree oven until hot and the top is golden brown.  Makes 25 servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 267 calories, 16 grams protein, 21 grams carbohydrates, 13 grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 535 mg. sodium, 2.3 grams fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For more recipes, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
FRESH TOMATO SALSA
Salsa is literally the Spanish word for “sauce”.  There are literally hundreds of variations, which usually include tomatoes, onion, garlic, hot peppers, cilantro, and an acid like vinegar or lime juice.  Armed with a food processor, you too can become a whiz at making fresh salsas.   Serve salsas over fish, with chicken. stir them into a salad, eat them on a sandwich!


8 ripe tomatoes, chopped and drained to remove juice
1 large red or white onion
2 cloves garlic, more to taste if desired
Grated zest and juice of 1 lime
1 jalapeno or other hot chile pepper, more to taste
Sea salt and fresh pepper
1/2 cup or more chopped fresh cilantro


In the bowl of your food processor, finely chop the garlic.  Add the onion and pulse to chop.  Wearing gloves, remove the seeds from the chile peppers.  Add to the food processor and chop.  Add the tomatoes and pulse to chop.  Stir in the lime zest, lime juice and season to taste with sea salt and fresh pepper.  Garlic salt may also be used to season.


VARIATIONS OF THE THEME:  Instead of red tomatoes, use a combination of yellow tomatoes and “tomatillos”, Mexican green tomatoes.  Try roasting the peppers in a hot oven or on the grill for a smoky flavor.  To prepare guacamole, pulse a clove or two of garlic in the food processor.  Add a ripe avocado and _ cup more or less of salsa.  Puree until smooth enough to eat.  It’s that simple!


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
ITALIAN INSPIRED PASTA WITH
MAINE WHITE BEANS & VEGGIES

This classic Italian dish is usually served as a soup.  Here we prepare it as a nutritional luncheon dish.  Feel free to vary the veggies and kinds of beans.  Let your imagination run wild!

3 ounces olive oil
3 cups onion, chopped  (about 1 pound)
3 celery pieces with leaves, chopped
3 cups broccoli, chopped (about 1 pound)
3 sweet bell peppers, seeded and chopped
6 or more garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
3 – 15 ounce cans chopped Italian plum tomatoes and juice
1.5 pounds whole wheat pasta (penne is a good shape) cooked until al dente
4.5 cups cooked Maine white beans
Sea salt and fresh pepper
1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, minced
2 tablespoons dried basil
1 tablespoon dried sage
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)
Freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Heat the oil in a large pan on top of the stove over moderate heat.  Add the onions and cook until they start to soften.  Add the garlic, celery and sweet bell pepper and cook until they start to soften.  Stir in the chopped tomatoes and juice, basil, broccoli, sage, rosemary and red pepper flakes.  Pour into a hotel pan.  Stir in the pasta.  Stir in the beans and heat thoroughly in a 350 degree oven, adding water if necessary. Taste and season to taste with sea salt and fresh pepper and more herbs if necessary. Serve with freshly grated Parmesan cheese.  Makes about 25 servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving:  205 calories, 8 grams protein, 35 grams carbohydrates, 4 grams fat, (0 grams trans fat), 250 mg. sodium, 5.5  grams fiber.  Nutritional bonus:  Good source of Vitamin C, thiamin, and folate. 

Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For more recipes, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
MAINE APPLE- GINGERBREAD
This is a wonderful snack based on a very old recipe for hot-water gingerbread.  The chopped apples give these cakes extra moistness and a wonderful flavor.  Maine Apple Gingerbread may also be  made into mini-muffins.  They all freeze well.


.5 cup canola oil
1 cup unsweetened applesauce
2 eggs
1.5 cups molasses
2 cups hot water

5 cups whole meal flour (available in health food stores or use whole wheat)*
2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons ginger
1 tablespoon baking soda

6 medium apples, cored, unpeeled, chopped in the food processor

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.  Grease or spray a full-sized hotel pan.
 
In a medium bowl, beat together the canola oil, applesauce, egg, and molasses.  Set aside.  In a large bowl, stir together the whole meal flour, cinnamon, ginger and baking soda.  Fold in the chopped apples.  Mix in the molasses mixture, then stir in the two cups of hot water.    Spread in the pan.  Bake in 375 degree oven until a toothpick comes out clean, about 45 - 50 minutes.   Let cool on a rack for a few minutes, then remove from the muffin tin.  Cut into 32 pieces.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 165 calories, 3 grams protein, 29 grams carbohydrates, 4.5 grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 134 mg. sodium, 3 grams fiber.
.
* Whole meal flour is made by grinding grain (wheat berries) and contains the germ and bran of the wheat.  It can often be purchased in health food stores, or you may substitute whole-wheat flour.

Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
MAPLE ROASTED ROOT VEGETABLES
The maple syrup highlights the natural sugars of root vegetables.  Vary the  root vegetables to include beets and potatoes. Maple Roasted Root Vegetables are an excellent way to utilize regional, seasonal  ingredients, and provide over 200% of the RDA for Vitamin A, 41% RDA for Vitamin C, and 19% for Vitamin K.


2.5 pounds peeled and chopped sweet potato
2 pounds peeled and chopped turnip
2 pounds peeled and chopped parsnip
2 pounds peeled and chopped carrots
1.5 pounds onions, chopped (be sure to leave in chunks, not finely chopped)

1 cup maple syrup
.5 cup olive oil
Sea salt and fresh pepper


Spray a baking sheet with cooking spray.  In large bowl, whisk together the maple syrup and olive oil.  Coat the vegetables with the mixture and season to taste with sea salt and fresh pepper.

Roast the vegetables in a preheated 450 degree oven until the vegetables are tender, about 35 minutes.  Stir and shake the vegetables every few minutes to cook evenly.  Season to taste again with sea salt and fresh pepper.  Makes about 25 servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving:  166 calories, 2 grams protein, 30 grams carbohydrates, 5 grams fat, 53 mg. sodium, 4.5 grams fiber.

Meal suggestion:  Maple Roasted Root Vegetables, Grilled Chicken Breast or Hamburger, Sautéed Spinach and Apple Slices for dessert.

Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy cooking and eating utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For additional recipes, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
PUMPKIN SNACK CAKES
My teenagers are always rummaging through the cupboards for a snack.  I make Pumpkin Snack Cakes and store them in the freezer.  Better than cookies, one little cake has over a gram of fiber and provides 20% of the RDA of Vitamin A.  Dry milk powder and chopped apricots replace the sugar to add extra calcium and Vitamin C.


Beat with electric mixer in large bowl:

1 – 15 ounce can pumpkin (1.5 cup cooked pumpkin)
.5 cup sugar
3 eggs
1 cup canola oil
1.5 cup skim milk
1.5 cup fat-free dry milk powder

Mix together in medium bowl:
2 cups all purpose flour
.5 cup wheat germ
2 cups whole wheat flour
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1.5 teaspoon grated nutmeg
2 tablespoons baking powder

Stir into pumpkin mixture.  Stir in 1 cup chocolate chips and .5 cup finely chopped dried apricots.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Spray mini-muffin pans with cooking spray.  Spoon batter into pans and bake until a toothpick comes out clean, about 15 minutes.  Let cool on rack.  Store in tins, plastic bags or plastic containers.  Makes 72 cakes.

Nutritional analysis per cake: 83 calories, 2 grams protein, 10 grams carbohydrates, 4 grams fat, 1 gram fiber, 29 mg sodium.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For photographs and more cooking tips visit our website at:  www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
WILD BLUEBERRY COBBLER
This delicious, low-sugar cobbler can also be prepared with blackberries.  Both fruits are excellent sources of phytochemicals and antioxidants.  Recipe was adapted from The New Vegetarian Epicure by Anna Thomas.


12 cups frozen or fresh Maine wild blueberries
1.5 cups sugar
3 tablespoons cornstarch
1 1/3 cups water
1/3 cup lemon juice

2 2/3 cups whole meal flour (or 2 cup all purpose and 2/3 cup wheat germ)
1/3 cup sugar
Generous 1 teaspoon baking soda
Generous 2 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
8 tablespoons butter, melted
1 1/3 cups liquid buttermilk

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.  In a large, non-reactive pot, combine the water, sugar, cornstarch and lemon juice.  Stir to dissolve, then add the fruit.  Bring the mixture to a simmer over medium heat and cook for a few minutes to cook the cornstarch.  Taste and correct the sugar or lemon juice if necessary.  Pour the mixture into a greased full –sized hotel baking pan.
In a medium bowl, mix together the dry ingredients (flour, baking soda and baking powder, sugar, and spices)  Melt the butter and whisk into the buttermilk.  Pour into the dry ingredients and stir until just combined.  The batter will be sticky.  Drop by spoonfuls onto the fruit.  Bake until the topping is golden, about 25 minutes.   Makes 25 servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 184 calories, 3 grams protein, 36 grams carbohydrates, 4 grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 111 mg. sodium, 4 grams fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while supporting a sustainable environment.  For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
Show as multiple pages

    

Home | Programs | Agricultural Services | The Fair | Certification | Events | Publications | Resources | Store | Support MOFGA | Contact | MOFGA.net | Search
  Copyright © 2013 Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association   Terms Of Use  Privacy Statement    Site by Planet Maine